Photography – Beatles in Liverpool

Photography – Beatles in Liverpool

I had to go on the Beatles tour didn’t I?

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I think this was George’s place

DSC_0577 DSC_0581 DSC_0586 This was John’sDSC_0589  This was Paul’s

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Ringo’s was all boarded up!!

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The Cavern – where it all happened.

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It was great fun and interesting to see where they all came from.

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The Beatles – All You Need is Love – Lyrics of optimism and hope that epitomised an era.

The Beatles – All You Need is Love – Lyrics of optimism and hope that epitomised an era.

 

The sixties was an idealistic, optimistic age. The Love and Peace image galvanised a generation and spread round the whole world. People in Pakistan, Peru and Russia were wearing flares and declaring brother and sisterhood. It changed the world

There was hope.

The events of the past decades have been of greed, selfishness and religious fanaticism. It has spawned inequality, poverty, war, death, torture and a divided world. Hatred breeds hatred. Violence traumatises people and spawns revenge.

We don’t seem to learn.

What the world needs now is a big does of love, friendship and a caring, helping hand.

The Beatles got it spot on. Where’s the new Beatles?

“All You Need Is Love”

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, loveThere’s nothing you can do that can’t be done
Nothing you can sing that can’t be sung
Nothing you can say but you can learn how to play the game
It’s easyNothing you can make that can’t be made
No one you can save that can’t be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It’s easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, love

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Nothing you can know that isn’t known
Nothing you can see that isn’t shown
Nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be
It’s easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

All you need is love (All together, now!)
All you need is love (Everybody!)
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Yee-hai! (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)

Yesterday (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Oh yeah! (Love is all you need)
She loves you, yeah yeah yeah (Love is all you need)
She loves you, yeah yeah yeah (Love is all you need)

Free – A little Bit of Love – lyrics that sum up a better way of living.

Free – A little Bit of Love – lyrics that sum up a better way of living.

 

What the world needs now is more naivety. We need some trust, love, fellowship and benevolence.

Back in the sixties, for a short while, we had a sharing, peaceful community. I liked it best like that. I believe that if you are open, altruistic and caring people respond to you. It works.

Most people are kind and pleasant. It is only the greedy, selfish, power-mad minority that spoil it all.

Perhaps we should all try giving out a little bit of love. We might just find it will come back at us.

“Little Bit Of Love”

I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh oh oh
Has gotta come your way.Well in my mind
It’s easy
To lose sight of the truth
But in my heart
I can’t deny
My feeling inside

‘Cos I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh oh oh
Has gotta come your way.

Man in the sky
You say you are flying
To lose sight of the world
You wanna stay high
Then don’t deny
Your feeling inside

‘Cos I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh oh oh
Has gotta come your way.

Yeahh!
Whooo!

I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh!
Has gotta come your way.

I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Whooooo
Has gotta come your way

Rock Routes – Sixties Soul – An extract from the book.

Rock Routes – Sixties Soul – An extract from the book.

 

The US 1960s Soul Scene

Soul music, as a continuation of the US R&B tradition, really took off in 1964 and became a huge commercial success partly due to the need for good dance music in the new 1960s Discotheques.

The term Soul was attached to this musical style due more to the vocal intensity and emotional content of the music rather than any ubiquitous style. This intense vocalisation had its roots in Gospel and was first introduced in secular R&B in the work of precursors such as Ray Charles, Little Willie John, Sam Cooke, James Brown, Jackie Wilson and Clyde McPhatter. It was apparent in both uptempo numbers and soulful ballads. The centre of Soul was on the West Coast Atlantic Label with its Southern subsidiary the infamous Stax label in Memphis. From 1964 onwards the charts became full of artists producing the sound that became known as Soul. These included Otis Redding, Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Lee Dorsey, Sam & Dave, Booker T & the MGs, Percy Sledge, Carla Thomas, Joe Tex, Arthur Conley and even the Blues guitarist Albert King.

This continued into the 1970s with artists such as Brook Benton, Betty Wright, Archie Bell & the Drells and the Detroit Spinners.

Soul was a huge commercial success and gave rise to two other major genres of black R&B with Disco and Funk. In Britain it gave rise to the Northern Soul Scene with its athletic dancing and in the 1980s it underwent a renaissance with New Wave Soul.

Throughout its history Soul has produced some of the most dynamic music and performances but has also tended to suffer from commercial exploitation. The emotional rawness of this dynamic Gospel tinged music endeared it to British Mods and many US Soul artists were brought across the Atlantic to perform in British clubs where they received rapturous support. Their success also stimulated the rise of a number of British Mod Soul Bands such as the Alan Bown Set, the Action, Geno Washington and the Ram Jam Band and Jimmy James and the Vagabonds. These bands, while copying the material of the US stars produced a type of music with a different feel to it.

The huge success of soul drew many established R&B artists into adopting the style including such stars as Lee Dorsey, Little Richard and James Brown.

Without doubt the greatest Soul Artist is Otis Redding. He started out as a Little Richard impersonator before further developing the anguished emotional intensity that we associate with him on numbers such as ‘Pain in my heart’. His stage act was the epitome of high energy Soul in the manner of James Brown. He would do crazy dancing and run on the spot while tearing at his clothes in a frenzy of emotion. His amazing vocal prowess is well displayed on numbers like ‘That’s how strong my love is’, ‘Respect’, Satisfaction’, and ‘Fa fa fa fa fa fa (sad song)’. Unfortunately his career was brought to a sudden end when he was killed in an air crash in late 1967. ‘(Sitting on the) Dock of the bay’ was released following his death and became his biggest hit. This came at the time when he was not only at his peak of performance and recording but was breaking through to the counter-culture audiences who were not usually drawn to Soul being more into psychedelia and acid rock. There is no telling where this would have led.

If Otis was the King of Soul then Aretha was the Queen. Having started out as a Gospel vocalist she was encouraged to move into secular R&B by none other than Sam Cooke who had been knocked out by the power and beauty of her voice. She signed to Columbia in 1960 but it was not until she signed to Atlantic in 1966 and got the full Soul treatment that she broke through. She went on to have a series of enormous hits with numbers like ‘Respect’, Baby I love you’, ‘I never loved a man’, ‘Chain of fools’ and ‘Think’.

The Atlantic Stax label was the undisputed home of Soul. This was primarily due to the fantastic backing and writing expertise that was coming from the house band Booker T & the MGs (Memphis Group). They were heard on the recordings of most of the great Soul singers including Otis, Aretha, Sam & Dave, William Bell and Rufus Thomas as well as having a big hand in writing many of their best numbers. Booker T & the MGs went on to have a number of hits in their own right – ‘Green Onions’, ‘Chinese checkers’, ‘Hip Hug Her’, Soul limbo’ and ‘Time is tight’.

Other Atlantic stars included Solomon Burke – the King of Rock & Soul – who employed a preaching style of vocal on numbers such as ‘If you need me’; Sam & Dave, who were a dynamic vocal duo similar to Don and Dewey, they had hits with hard driving numbers – ‘You don’t know like I know’, ‘I take what I want’, ‘Hold on I’m coming’ and ‘ Soul man’ as well as softer Soul ballads – ‘When something is wrong with my baby’; Wilson Pickett, who started in the 1950s with a vocal group called the Falcons signed to Stax in 1964 and had a string of hits with high energy singles like ‘In the midnight hour’, ‘Mustang Sally’, ‘Land of a 1000 dances’, ‘Funky Broadway’, ‘6345789’ and ‘Don’t fight it’; Percy Sledge, whose powerful clear vocals secured him great success with ‘When a man loves a woman’ and ‘Warm and tender love’; King Curtis, who was a session saxophonist who had previously played on the Coasters hits ‘Yakety Yak’ and ‘Charlie Brown’, become part of the house band with both the MGs and the Markeys as well as having hits in his own right with ‘Memphis Soul Stew’ and ‘Teasin’; Eddie Floyd, who started out with Wilson Pickett in the Falcons and produced the classic ‘Knock on wood’; Arthur Conley, who gained the title of ‘Crown Prince of Soul’, for the energetic stage act he produced using a similar stage craft to Otis on uptempo numbers such as ‘Show me’ before giving up music in 1970 to become a real preacher; Patti Labelle & the Bluebelles, who started as a female Doo-Wop band in the 1950s before signing to Atlantic in 1965 and had hits with ‘All or nothing’, ‘Over the rainbow’, ‘Groovy kind of love’ and ‘take me for a little while’; the Staples Singers, who started out as a 1950s Gospel group before joining Stax in 1968 and had a number of hits with ‘Respect yourself’, ‘Be what you are’ and ‘You’ve got to earn it’.

Artists on other labels also broke into the Soul scene including Lee Dorsey, the Impressions and Gladys Knight & the Pips. Lee started out in the 1950s with R&B hits such as ‘Ya-Ya’ and ‘Do Re Mi’ before joining up with the Amy/Mala/Bell complex in the mid 1960s and having Soul hits with ‘Get out of my life’, ‘Confusion’, ‘Holy cow’, ‘Ride your pony’ and ‘Working in a coal mine’. The Impressions featured Curtis Mayfield and had a number of Soul hits in the 1960s with ‘You must believe’, ‘I’m so proud’, ‘Amen’, ‘Keep on pushing’ and ‘People get ready’. They then moved into Black Consciousness with numbers like ‘This is my country’, ‘Choice of colours’ and ‘Mighty mighty spade and whitey’. Gladys Knight & the Pips produced some Soul sounds with numbers like ‘I heard it through the grapevine’.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Opher-Goodwin/e/B00MSHUX6Y/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1436787369&sr=1-2-ent

Leonard Cohen – The Old Revolution – lyrics about the need to involve yourself. Life is a battle. We need to fight (non-violently) to make it better.

Leonard Cohen – The Old Revolution – lyrics about the need to involve yourself. Life is a battle. We need to fight (non-violently) to make it better.

This is a genius of a poem. There is so much in it.

Most people go through life without involving themselves. This is a plea to them to get involved. We have to fight and make our voices heard if we want the world to change for the better.

We have to do that despite the fact that there is no pure cause, that all our heroes are flawed, that we are sold down the river, that are goals are muddied, that our leaders are doing it for power and wealth, that we can never achieve what we would like. We still have to launch ourselves into the fray and try.

That is what life is about.

When we are young and full of idealism it seems pure and easy. Then we find we were betrayed by our heroes and used. But we still have to find a way to stay true to that idealism and carry on the struggle.

For me, no matter how perverted, there is a redolence to ISIS. All these silly young men and women fired up on religious fervour are being manipulated and used by a bunch of cynical people intent on sadism, power and sex. There’s no religious purity in it. They soldiers are indoctrinated, filled with lies and pointed at the enemy. They should wake up and use their idealism, to do something good.

While there is injustice, poaching of animals, war, torture, brutality, bigotry, fundamentalism, hatred, destruction of the environment, racism, misogyny and cruelty there is a war.

It is our duty to get involved and oppose it.

It only takes good men to remain silent for evil to exist.

“The Old Revolution”

I finally broke into the prison,
I found my place in the chain.
Even damnation is poisoned with rainbows,
all the brave young men
they’re waiting now to see a signal
which some killer will be lighting for pay.
Into this furnace I ask you now to venture,
you whom I cannot betray.I fought in the old revolution
on the side of the ghost and the King.
Of course I was very young
and I thought that we were winning;
I can’t pretend I still feel very much like singing
as they carry the bodies away.Into this furnace I ask you now to venture…

Lately you’ve started to stutter
as though you had nothing to say.
To all of my architects let me be traitor.
Now let me say I myself gave the order
to sleep and to search and to destroy.

Into this furnace I ask you now to venture…

Yes, you who are broken by power,
you who are absent all day,
you who are kings for the sake of your children’s story,
the hand of your beggar is burdened down with money,
the hand of your lover is clay.

Into this furnace I ask you now to venture…

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Elvis Presley/Joe Turner – Shake Rattle and Roll – Lyrics of a blatantly sexual theme.

Elvis Presley/Joe Turner – Shake Rattle and Roll – Lyrics of a blatantly sexual theme.

When Elvis wiggled his hips he knew exactly what he was doing.

Elvis wasn’t the polite innocent he pretended to be. His act was pure sex. He chose to cover songs like Shake Rattle and Roll with their overt sexuality knowing exactly what they were about. Elvis was sex on wheels.

It was no wonder that the repressed prudish post-war generation were so up in arms, Elvis brought in a wave of liberalism and non-conformity that swept away all the grey fifties and heralded the rebellion of the sixties.

Black musicians like Joe Turner were already singing about sex and having a wail of a time. It was the white culture that needed to catch up. But the record company was a bit slow. They insisted he clean up the lyrics a bit. They didn’t like  – Way you wear those dresses The sun comes shinin’ through  I can’t believe my eyes  All that mess belongs to you. They seemed to think there were sexual connotations.

There were.

Elvis opened the flood gate.

Shake Rattle and Roll

Get outta that bed
Wash your face and hands
Get outta that bed
Wash your face and hands
Well, you get in that kitchen
Make some noise with the pots and pans

Way you wear those dresses
The sun comes shinin’ through
Way you wear those dresses
The sun comes shinin’ through
I can’t believe my eyes
All that mess belongs to you

I believe to the soul
You’re the devil and now I know
I believe to the soul
You’re the devil and now I know
Well, the more I work
The faster my money goes

I said shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Well, you won’t do right
To save your doggone soul

Yeah, blow, Joe

I’m like a one-eyed cat
Peepin’ in a seafood store
I’m like a one-eyed cat
Peepin’ in a seafood store
Well, I can look at you
Till you ain’t no child no more

Ah, shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Well, you won’t do right
Yo save your doggone soul

I get over the hill
And way down underneath
I get over the hill
And way down underneath
You make me roll my eyes
Even make me grit my teeth

I said shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Well, you won’t do nothin’
To save your doggone soul

Shake, rattle and roll

Rock Music Genres – The British Blues Beat Groups of the early 60s – The Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, Them, Pretty Things, Downliners Sect and Animals.

Rock Music Genres – The British Blues Beat Groups of the early 60s – The Rolling Stones, Yardbirds, Them, Pretty Things, Downliners Sect and Animals.

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The British Beat Group Blues boom – 1964

Hard on the heels of Merseybeat came the first British Blues boom in the form of the sixties beat groups. They were led by the Rolling Stones but closely followed by the Animals, Pretty Things, Yardbirds, Downliners Sect, Manfred Mann, Bo St Runners, Kinks and Them.

The real pioneers of this Blues boom were Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated, Graham Bond and Zoot Money. But, while being seminal, they did not receive the commercial success of their compatriots.

The blues set, of which I was one, were a little snooty when it came to the blues. We saw it as superior to the Pop and Rock of the day. It seemed raw, earthy and authentic, not produced as a product by the record companies. This was genuine music from the heart, or at least the genitals. It spoke of real life and not soppy love, and teenage crap. You could wander about looking incredible serious and intellectual clutching your Sleepy John Estes and Elmore James albums. It was all very cliquey. And this was precisely how many of these bands came together. They were passionate aficionados. To us blues wasn’t just a music form; it was a crusade. We loved it and we loved those old black guys from the depths of Mississippi, Texas and Louisiana. It was an exclusive club.

In the Art Colleges all over the country various passionate blues musicians got together to swap their precious collections of coveted albums, learn licks, exchange tales and learn how to imitate their idols. They didn’t do it quite the same. They speeded it up a bit, added a bit of a rave up, but in general were remarkably true to the music of their heroes. They might have wanted to make the big time but it was more important to be true to the music, do it justice and win the respect of your fellow musicians. In the process it created a great club scene and a lot of followers. The blues was cool.

From the Deep South of the Thames Delta we had the Rolling Stones and Yardbirds fighting it out for supremacy in Richmond and the Kinks and Pretty Things battling with the Downliners Sect. From the swamps and levees of Newcastle we had the Animals and from the plantations of Ireland we had Them. Almost overnight the blues was the biggest thing going and the kids were all dancing to the music of black southern America.

The catalogues of Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Robert Johnson, Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and John Lee Hooker were plundered.

The Stones nearly hit with their first single – a cover of Chuck Berry’s ‘Come On’ and then had theit first top ten hit with a song given to them by the Beatles. After that it was all systems go. They actually got to number one with an extremely authentic version of Howlin’ Wolf’s ‘Little Red Rooster’. Their first two albums were stuffed with blues covers. Likewise the Kinks first album was full of Swamp Blues. Them hit the charts with ‘Baby Please Don’t Go’. There were covers of ‘Dimples’, ‘Got My Mojo Working’, ‘I’m a Lover not a Fighter’, ‘Got Love if You Want It’, ‘Good Morning Little Schoolgirl’, ‘Hoochie Coochie Man’, ‘I Just Want to Make Love to You’, ‘I Ain’t Got You’, ‘Cadillac’, ‘Honest I Do’, ‘I’m a Man’, ‘I’m Mad Again’, ‘I Wish You Would’, ‘Smokestack Lightnin’’, Mona (I Need You Baby)’, ‘Too Much Monkey Business’, ‘Around and Round’, ‘Bo Diddley’, ‘You Can’t Judge a Book’, ‘You Can’t Catch Me’, ‘Boom Boom’, and a dozen more. The blues was selling to white kids. They were in the playground discussing blues harp, slide guitar and square guitars. The exclusive club had opened right up.

This in turn paved the way for the blues guys to come back over from America. Middle-aged blues guys like Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Sonny Boy Williamson and John Lee Hooker received rapturous receptions from young white kids while mini-skirted white girls danced to their rhythm. They must have been amaqzed. It was a million miles away from the sweaty Chicago clubs.

The Press had a field day. They pitted the long-haired, scruffy blues bands against the smart suited Mersey bands. There were the lovable mop-tops and the obscene and dangerous Stones who you wouldn’t want your daughter going within a hundred miles of. It was great fun and of course the Stones manager – Andrew Loog Oldham – lapped it up and fed it for all it was worth.

What it did to the music was to bring a harder edge to the sound. It was not so Poppy and over-produced. There was a rough, raw edge to it. This was not commercial pop; this was unrefined blues – and it rocked! The excitement and energy was right there in your face!

The first band I ever saw live were the British Birds with Ron Wood on guitar. The second band I caught was Them when ‘Baby Please Don’t Go’ was riding high in the charts. I was in my element.

Of course it couldn’t last. The blues bands were quickly joined by the Mod bands and soon everyone was writing their own material. It all became more ‘original’ sounding and the blues became only one component.

You can see it with the Stones – the first two albums were heavily Blues and then the music changed. Likewise with the Downliners Sect – one superb blues album and then into country. The Kinks – one Swamp Blues album and then their own distinctive sound. The blues phase moved on and burnt itself out. After 1964 the British Blues Beat Bands changed their sound.

The irony was that, on the back of the Beatles and Merseybeat, the British Beat groups exported blues back to America. The Rolling Stones, Animals and Yardbirds got the American white kids dancing to black American blues. The real thing might have been playing on their doorsteps and they had never heard it. They went for the sound of the British Beat groups with a vengeance. The blues invaded America.

Rock Music Genres – Skiffle – a seminal British scene in the fifties.

Rock Music Genres – Skiffle – a seminal British scene in the fifties.

 

Skiffle – British 1950s

Skiffle was a term that came over from Black slang in the fifties. It referred to the type of party where music was played and a hat passed round to reward the musicians.

In the post-war period of the fifties things were still bleak in Britain. The cities had been heavily bombed and every street was littered with bomb-sites. There was still rationing, shortages of clothes and austerity. But the war was over and the kids wanted to get out and enjoy themselves. This was the age before TV. Houses just had a radio and, if you were very lucky, a record player which played 78s.

While the States, who had largely escaped the devastation that had ravaged Europe, was enjoying a boom; where the kids were cruising in cadillacs, listening to Rock and R&B and going to drive-ins, we were having a much harder time.

In the States the intelligentsia was getting into Kerouac, Beat poetry and Zen. In Britain it was Trad. Jazz and CND marches.

Chris Barber was one of those Jazz men and he had a liking for the blues. So much so that he brought some of the blues singers over to Britain and introduced British audiences to the real blues. This paved the way for Cyril Davies and Alexis Korner to set up their R&B band Blues Incorporated. So you could say that Chris Barber was the father of the whole Rock scene. He was also the inaugurator of Skiffle.

Chris was a purveyor of authentic New Orleans Jazz and one of the best. But in the interval he allowed a little offshoot of the band to do a slot. They were a pared back group of musicians with basic guitar, bass and snare who did a series of American Folk-Blues numbers by the likes of Leadbelly, Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee and even Woody Guthrie. They proved popular.

At a recording session Chris Barber had a bit of time to kill and allowed the Skiffle group led by Lonnie Donnegan to record a few numbers. The rest is history.

One of the tracks got some airplay and the response was so strong that it was released as a single ‘Rock Island Line’, a Leadbelly number, soared straight to number one and started a country-wide craze. Lonnie Donnegan, who had taken his name from the blues singer Lonnie Johnson, was more popular than Elvis.

The beauty of Skiffle was its simplicity. You only needed two chords and it could be largely played on homemade instruments. You needed your mother’s old washboard with a few thimbles, a tea-chest and broom handle bass, and an old beat-up guitar and you were away. All the lads wanted to be in a band and get the girls. Every town sprouted Skiffle Groups and venues. The country might have been poor but it came alive.

It proved a short-term craze. Lonnie had a number of hits and was joined by the Vipers, Chas McDevitt and Nancy Whiskey and a few others and it was over.

Lonnie branched out into novelty songs and Skiffle passed into history. Except it didn’t. The importance of Skiffle wasn’t just in the music and hits it had produced. It had got a whole generation of kids into music and opened up a lot of clubs. Those Skiffle bands learnt more chords, got better instruments and went on to form the Rock and R&B bands that were going to form the Mersey and Beat bands of the British Invasion. The kids had been attracted in, got a taste for performing, had the venues to get up on stage and never looked back. Without Skiffle there might not have been a British Beat boom or an interest in blues.

The Beatles were typical. They started off as the Quarrymen Skiffle group before heading into Rock ‘n’ Roll and R&B. Guitar gods like Jimmy Page were the same. Skiffle was transformational.

Just goes to show! Life is changed by the smallest things. If Chris had not had a bit of extra time on the recording session, or had not liked blues and given Lonnie a chance, history would have been different.

Bob Marley – Get up Stand up – lyrics about speaking up for your rights as a human being.

Bob Marley – Get up Stand up – lyrics about speaking up for your rights as a human being.

Nobody will do it for you.

All human beings are equal. No right that we have has been achieved without a fight. People have had to stand up in the face of violence and intimidation. History is littered with the causes.

Democracy was fought for long and hard. The vote was won in blood.

The Enlightenment was the result of brave people standing up and speaking out for the right to believe in whatever god or none.

The injustices in the world will not just go away. No god will come from the sky to make things right, there will be no heaven to rectify the injustices, no karma to reward or punish actions; we have to do it ourselves.

Equality and freedom are powerful words. Whether it is the economic injustice created by unfair systems, the political injustices of tyrants or the religious fanaticism and intolerance of ISIS; it has to be opposed.

We have to make our voices heard if we want to make the world a fairer, harmonious place.

That does not require violence; it only needs brother and sisterhood, one voice and a democratic vote.

Bob Marley – Get Up, Stand Up Lyrics

Get up, stand up, stand up for your right (3 times)
Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight

Preacher man don’t tell me heaven is under the earth
I know you don’t know what life is really worth
Is not all that glitters in gold and
Half the story has never been told
So now you see the light, aay
Stand up for your right. Come on

Get up, stand up, stand up for your right
Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight
(Repeat)

Most people think great God will come from the sky
Take away ev’rything, and make ev’rybody feel high
But if you know what life is worth
You would look for yours on earth
And now you see the light
You stand up for your right, yeah!

Get up, stand up, stand up for your right
Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight
Get up, stand up. Life is your right
So we can’t give up the fight
Stand up for your right, Lord, Lord
Get up, stand up. Keep on struggling on
Don’t give up the fight

We’re sick and tired of your ism and skism game
Die and go to heaven in Jesus’ name, Lord
We know when we understand
Almighty God is a living man
You can fool some people sometimes
But you can’t fool all the people all the time
So now we see the light
We gonna stand up for our right

So you’d better get up, stand up, stand up for your right
Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight
Get up, stand up, stand up for your right
Get up, stand up, don’t give up the fight

 

Rock Genres – Psychedelia.

Rock Genres – Psychedelia.

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Psychedelia was the name given to the British music produced in the mid to late sixties influenced by the psychotropic substances such as LSD – Lysergic Acid Diethylamide.

The similar type of music produced on the West Coast of America was called Acid Rock. The two styles fed off each other and were an important element of the sixties counter-culture that is stereotyped as ‘Hippie’.

LSD was legal in the mid-sixties (It was only made illegal in Britain in 1966, in 1966 in California but not until 1968 federally). The interaction of the Rock industry and Youth Culture between the UK and US meant that the two scenes were well integrated.

The drugs of choice of the Rock Bands included marijuana and LSD. At the time these drugs were widely regarded in the Youth Culture of the day as being mind expanding. The generation gap reflected this. The ‘old’ generation with their alcohol and tobacco were seen as unhip while the ‘young’ generation with their dope and Acid were seen as cool.

The Rock musicians in the mid-sixties were indulging in a lot of hallucinogens. The results can be heard in the music of the day. In 1966 a definite Psychedelic tinge was discernible. On the Revolver album the Beatles were producing numbers like ‘Tomorrow Never Knows’. This was a sign of what was to come. Other established bands, such as the Yardbirds (with the immaculate Jeff Beck on guitar), were producing numbers like ‘Over Under Sideways Down’, The Pretty Things were producing the Rock Opera ‘SF Sorrow’ with tracks like £SD. Eric Burdon split the Animals up to create the New Animals. The Who were releasing tracks like ‘I Can See For Miles’ and the Move ‘I Can Hear the Grass Grow’.

The earliest Psychedelic sound was actually an album by Alan Watts called ‘This is It’ and early converts were Donovan with ‘Sunshine Superman’ and Roy Harper released the psychedelic ‘China Girl’ on his first album.

1967 was the year when Psychedelia went interstellar. Pink Floyd led the way with their ground-breaking ‘Piper at the Gates of Dawn’. Syd Barrett was the mastermind of the spacey Sci-fi ‘Interstellar Overdrive’ and the fantasy imagery that was to become part and parcel of Psychedelia. Hendrix was blasting us with ‘Axis Bolder than Love’ with numbers like ‘Spanish Castle Magic’. The Beatles came out with ‘Sgt Peppers’ and the Stones did ‘Their Satanic Majesties Request’. There were a plethora of other bands including Arthur Brown, Family, Traffic, Tomorrow, Spooky Tooth, Edgar Broughton, Soft Machine, Procol Harum, Incredible String Band, Moody Blues and Action. Blues Bands like Cream got in on the scene with their Disreali Gears album and Pete Green’s Fleetwood Mac released ‘Green Manalishi’.

The clubs were full of light shows and happenings.

The charts were full of psuedo-psychedelic Pop such as the Lemon Pipers, Status Quo, the Flower-pot Men and Scott McKenzie.

Out in the streets it was different. There was a social revolution. The British and American counterculture were burgeoning and Acid Rock with Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band, Jefferson Airplane, Grateful Dead, Country Joe & the Fish, Big Brother and the Holding Company, Buffalo Springfield, Doors, Byrds and Quicksilver Messenger Service were setting the pace.

All the clubs were full of Psychedelic sounds and US Acid Rock and there were a plethora of smaller bands like Blossom Toes, Andwella’s Dream, Syn, Idle Race, Misunderstood and Dantalion’s Chariot.

The fashions also reflected this Psychedelia. Paisley and fluorescent colours were in. It was all colourful and voluminous – very trippy.

The repercussions are still audible today!