Photography – Beatles in Liverpool

Photography – Beatles in Liverpool

I had to go on the Beatles tour didn’t I?

DSC_0502DSC_0573 DSC_0574

I think this was George’s place

DSC_0577 DSC_0581 DSC_0586 This was John’sDSC_0589  This was Paul’s

DSC_0590

Ringo’s was all boarded up!!

DSC_0592

The Cavern – where it all happened.

DSC_0599 DSC_0607

It was great fun and interesting to see where they all came from.

Advertisements

The Beatles – All You Need is Love – Lyrics of optimism and hope that epitomised an era.

The Beatles – All You Need is Love – Lyrics of optimism and hope that epitomised an era.

 

The sixties was an idealistic, optimistic age. The Love and Peace image galvanised a generation and spread round the whole world. People in Pakistan, Peru and Russia were wearing flares and declaring brother and sisterhood. It changed the world

There was hope.

The events of the past decades have been of greed, selfishness and religious fanaticism. It has spawned inequality, poverty, war, death, torture and a divided world. Hatred breeds hatred. Violence traumatises people and spawns revenge.

We don’t seem to learn.

What the world needs now is a big does of love, friendship and a caring, helping hand.

The Beatles got it spot on. Where’s the new Beatles?

“All You Need Is Love”

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, loveThere’s nothing you can do that can’t be done
Nothing you can sing that can’t be sung
Nothing you can say but you can learn how to play the game
It’s easyNothing you can make that can’t be made
No one you can save that can’t be saved
Nothing you can do but you can learn how to be you in time
It’s easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Love, love, love
Love, love, love
Love, love, love

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

Nothing you can know that isn’t known
Nothing you can see that isn’t shown
Nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be
It’s easy

All you need is love
All you need is love
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need

All you need is love (All together, now!)
All you need is love (Everybody!)
All you need is love, love
Love is all you need
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Yee-hai! (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)

Yesterday (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Love is all you need (Love is all you need)
Oh yeah! (Love is all you need)
She loves you, yeah yeah yeah (Love is all you need)
She loves you, yeah yeah yeah (Love is all you need)

Has digital destroyed Rock Music?

Has digital destroyed Rock Music?

 

Once upon a time my Saturday’s were spent hunting round a string of second-hand record shops. I would meet up with similar people and have a chat and a laugh. There were bargains to be had. It was all about knowing your stuff; knowing about the artists and albums, the labels and genres. I would find the odd gem plus a number of OK albums and carry them off home to peruse at leisure.

Those were fun days.

When I got home I would spend time looking over my finds. I would read the blurb o the back avidly and look at the photos. Then I’d play them through. Sometimes I would play an album endlessly until I knew every note, every word and the melody. It was an experience.

The excitement of finding a treasure set the heart pounding. You would hold it and look at it and feel the adrenalin rush.

Every time you went out it was with the possibility at the front of your mind. Maybe today you would find that magic album? It was possible.

Nowadays that has gone.

It is not the same trawling on Amazon or Ebay. Everything is there. You are merely haggling about the price.

The digital era means that you can download an artists entire output in seconds. What used to take years of searching and know-how is now available at the click of a button. There is no hunting, no excitement at the unexpected find and no big pay-off when you have it all.

There are the benefits that now everything is available and all those forgotten gems are there at your finger-tips. There are the missing tracks, the unreleased material and a wealth of live concerts. Things have come out of the woodwork that you never knew existed. Who has been sitting on all this stuff? Why wasn’t it available fifty years ago when we would have drooled over it?

The downside is that it has all been devalued. Music has lost its lustre. It does not have the same significance.

Any spotty kid who knows sod-all about music can have the complete set of Chess singles or the entire Trojan catalogue and he doesn’t even know what he’s got.

I’m drowning in a glut of great music but I’m listening to less. Then there is the thing about the quality. Where is all the brilliant new music? Why is so much of it over-produced dross?

I miss those Saturday discussions, meetings, arguments and the hunting. I miss the adrenalin. I miss the buzz and I miss all the social implications.

But then I’m an old dinosaur.

Post navigation

11 thoughts on “Has digital destroyed Rock Music?”

  1. You said it all, hit the nail right on the head.
    I absolutely hate mp3’s. If anyone tells me “oh, yeah, I downloaded it”, they’ll get a reply from me such as “you ain’t got f*** all matey, you THINK you have, but you’ve not actually HEARD the music”. Quite how anyone can be satisfied with the aural experience of between 5 – 6.5% of the music information is utterly beyond me. I can feel my stomach churning at their inadequacy and mediocrity and total lack of regard to what can be, given the correct circumstances, absolutely fantastic.
    A few weeks ago a friend brought his 15 year old son round. The boy is really into The Who. He had come to the right house. After him falling over just looking at the selection, I asked him if he’d like to hear a vinyl record – he had never heard one. He choose “Quadrophenia” and when the band kicked in after the first minute of wave noises, he physically jumped up off his chair in shock.
    It was hilarious, he was speechless. He’s now saving up for a turntable and has been back round to make himself a list of the records he needs to get. I will of course help him with that adventure.

    I feel very positive about the future of the vinyl record.

    1. I’m so glad to hear that. People get used to tinny rubbish. The power of the real thing is lost. I’m glad a new generation will have that experience. Cheers Opher

  2. I agree almost entirely with you. I disagree that there is no good new music to be found. There is an amazing explosion of good creative artistry going on in the folk-world and the home-recording studio has led to another explosion of good indie musicians, albeit swamped by the plethora of rap and similar music incorporating home studio effects and techniques.

    There is no doubt that vinyl and physical metal needle styli has been proved to produce the warmest and most accurate rendering of the original sound pieces laid on the vinyl record. However, as previously noted the metal styli is the direct cause of deterioration of any given vinyl record.

    The latest technology appears to offer the best of both worlds, with vinyl records being read by a lazer. If I had the money, that would be the setup I’d look to go for.

    As it is, with the help of an Uncle known as Blackbeard, I have the complete works in FLAC and MP3s of most of my favourite artists, so that I can listen through each record as an MP3, and If I like it I will burn the corresponding CD from the FLAC file, and subsequently listen to it as a CD on my compact stereo system.

    1. Cheers Ian. I’m sure there’s loads around that’s good. I don’t get to hear a lot of it. Most of the popular stuff sounds overproduced and bland. I like it raw, loud and preferably with some meaning attached! I’m too busy writing to get around as much as I’d like.
      What would you recommend?

  3. Within the folk world there are so many good acts out there. Pretty much most of it gets aired on Mark Radcliffe’s BBC Radio prog on Wednesday evenings. Mike Harding also produces a regular hour long Internet radio Folk show, which is available as an MP3 podcast after being broadcast.

    My personal favourites amongst the new wave of folk include The Unthanks, Lisa Hannigan and Laura Marling along with the various outgrowths from the Folk Musician Supergroups Blowzabella and the Old Swann Band.

    I havent really found any original new loud electric music that has rocked my boat since discovering Counting Crows in the early 2000s. However there are a lot of very good cover bands out there who are well worth going to see. I’m not sure if The Hamsters are still going, but as their stageshow consisted of 2 sets each of Hendrix, ZZ Top and the Doors, along with their own material, I’d always go see them anytime they pass my way

    1. I missed out on the Hamsters but I heard all about them. I’ve turned on to Laura Marling. I’ll give the others a listen. Thanks for that Ian.
      Have you heard the Mississippi Allstars? They are probably my favourite around aty the moment and I do love the Eels!

I’d like to hear from you… Cancel reply

Enter your comment here…

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

Gravatar
Name (required)

Website

Gravatar

Opher: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Notify me of new comments via email.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Roy Harper – When an old cricketer leaves the crease – a delicate poem for those who are gone.

Roy Harper – When an old cricketer leaves the crease – a delicate poem for those who are gone.

 

A good friend of mine died yesterday. I’m putting this up here for Margaret!

Life is a game. We live like a brief flames and then we are gone. It is how you play the game that is important.

Roy is Britain’s foremost songwriter and poet. This is one of his most beautiful efforts. It is an evocative elegy to a life well spent, a game well played and the importance of playing it seriously, with all your heart, all your spirit and with great enjoyment and pleasure.

Roy has always put in one hundred per cent. You cannot deny his passion or his skill. This delicately crafted song will live forever.

It is a love song about death and the memories that linger, the ripples that go on to turn the tides.

It is one of the great songs of the English culture. What could be more fitting than to use the metaphor of cricket – the epitome of culture, the master of games.

When an old cricketer leaves the crease

When the day is done and the ball has spun in the umpires pocket away
And all remains in the groundsman’s pains for the rest of time and a day
There’ll be one mad dog and his master, pushing for four with the spin
On a dusty pitch with two pounds six of willow wood in the sun.

When an old cricketer leaves the crease, you never know whether he’s gone
If sometimes you’re catching a fleeting glimpse of a twelfth man at silly Mid-on
And it could be Geoff and it could be John with a new ball sting in his tail
And it could be me and it could be thee and it could be the sting in the ale, sting in the ale.

When an old cricketer leaves the crease, well you never know whether he’s gone
If sometimes you’re catching a fleeting glimpse of a twelfth man at silly Mid-on
And it could be Geoff and it could be John with a new ball sting in his tail
And it could be me and it could be thee and it could be the sting in the ale, sting in the ale.

When the moment comes and the gathering stands and the clock turns back to reflect
On the years of grace as those footsteps trace for the last time out of the act
Well this way of life’s recollection, the hallowed strip in the haze
The fabled men and the noonday sun are much more than just yarns of their days.

When an old cricketer leaves the crease, well you never know whether he’s gone
If sometimes you’re catching a fleeting glimpse of a twelfth man at silly Mid-on
And it could be Geoff and it could be John with a new ball sting in his tail
And it could be me and it could be thee and it could be the sting in the ale, the sting in the ale.

When an old cricketer leaves the crease, well you never know whether he’s gone
If sometimes you’re catching a fleeting glimpse of a twelfth man at silly Mid-on
And it could be Geoff and it could be John with a new ball sting in his tail
And it could be me and it could be thee.

 

 

Bob Marley – Africa Unite – A Rasta song about the black Rastas returning to their homeland in Africa.

Bob Marley – Africa Unite – A Rasta song about the black Rastas returning to their homeland in Africa.

I like this song even though it is rather daft. One of the tenets of the Rastafarian religion was the migration of all black people back to Africa. It’s a very naïve idea and will never happen. Most black people are quite settled and integrated into the cultures of their own countries. They would find Africa a very different place to what they are used to. Then there are the numbers to consider.

It is however a nice romantic idea to have a spiritual affinity to the land that your forefathers came from. Ultimately all human beings came from Ethiopia so we, black, brown, red, yellow or pink, can all identify with the sentiment. I, as a white man, felt a tremendous affinity with Africa. We can’t, all 7 billion of us, all live there though.

From my perspective Rastafarianism was quite a hotch-potch of various religious, political and secular aspects brought together to create a rather strange new ‘religion’. The sacrament of ganga, the politics of Marcus Garvey, the dreadlocks, the deification of Haile Selassie and idea of Ethiopia as a homeland, reggae music, the old testament and black god. I could see the value for black self-esteem and cultural identity, it gave the poor blacks of Jamaica something to adhere to, it also proved attractive as an image to many blacks outside of Jamaica, but it was all so contrived. It is probably how all religions emerge.

“Africa Unite”

Ziya-po ya-ya, pa-pa-ya-pa!
Ti-da-lee, na po-po pu-du-loo!
Ste-na-peh na-na po po-ro po!
Africa unite:
‘Cause we’re moving right out of Babylon,
And we’re going to our Father’s land, yea-ea.

How good and how pleasant it would be before God and man, yea-eah! –
To see the unification of all Africans, yeah! –
As it’s been said a’ready, let it be done, yeah!
We are the children of the Rastaman;
We are the children of the Iyaman.

So-o, Africa unite:
‘Cause the children (Africa unite) wanna come home.
Africa unite:
‘Cause we’re moving right out of Babylon, yea,
And we’re grooving to our Father’s land, yea-ea.

How good and how pleasant it would be before God and man
To see the unification of all Rastaman, yeah.
As it’s been said a’ready, let it be done!
I tell you who we are under the sun:
We are the children of the Rastaman;
We are the children of the Iyaman.

So-o: Africa unite,
Afri – Africa unite, yeah!
Unite for the benefit (Africa unite) for the benefit of your people!
Unite for it’s later (Africa unite) than you think!
Unite for the benefit (Africa unite) of my children!
Unite for it’s later (Africa uniting) than you think!
Africa awaits (Africa unite) its creators!
Africa awaiting (Africa uniting) its Creator!
Africa, you’re my (Africa unite) forefather cornerstone!
Unite for the Africans (Africa uniting) abroad
Unite for the Africans (Africa unite) a yard! [fadeout]

Free – A little Bit of Love – lyrics that sum up a better way of living.

Free – A little Bit of Love – lyrics that sum up a better way of living.

 

What the world needs now is more naivety. We need some trust, love, fellowship and benevolence.

Back in the sixties, for a short while, we had a sharing, peaceful community. I liked it best like that. I believe that if you are open, altruistic and caring people respond to you. It works.

Most people are kind and pleasant. It is only the greedy, selfish, power-mad minority that spoil it all.

Perhaps we should all try giving out a little bit of love. We might just find it will come back at us.

“Little Bit Of Love”

I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh oh oh
Has gotta come your way.Well in my mind
It’s easy
To lose sight of the truth
But in my heart
I can’t deny
My feeling inside

‘Cos I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh oh oh
Has gotta come your way.

Man in the sky
You say you are flying
To lose sight of the world
You wanna stay high
Then don’t deny
Your feeling inside

‘Cos I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh oh oh
Has gotta come your way.

Yeahh!
Whooo!

I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Oh!
Has gotta come your way.

I believe
If you give
A little bit of love
To those you live with
A little bit of love
Whooooo
Has gotta come your way

Poetry – Strife – a poem about living your life in a way that improves the world.

Poetry – Strife – a poem about living your life in a way that improves the world.

I was listening to Bob Marley on the radio. It seemed to me that he made equality, freedom and justice the centre of his being and expressed it in all he did.

It was inspiring.

You can live your life happily and express your philosophy in all you do, with a smile.

For love, smiling and friendliness is not weakness and some things are even worth putting your life at risk for.

Tolerance, freedom, justice, equality and fairness are merely words. They implicitly carry respect and responsibility within their compass. But when those words are put into practice they produce happiness, harmony and love.

That’s the future I fight for with every word.

I won’t impose my views on you if you refrain from imposing yours. To argue is good. To listen is better. To respect each other is necessary.

I want freedom with a smile; tolerance with respect and no indoctrination.

I want humans living in harmony with the planet.

That seems worth basing your philosophy on.

Strife

All my life is strife

Until I achieve my aims.

For my philosophy has energy

With which to play the games.

Equality and frivolity

Go hand in hand;

Connecting a great wisdom

To the zest of the gland.

Freedom we feed on

As we strive to be heard.

For the power of a bomb

Is less than of a single word.

Tolerance is no offence

It is the basis of what is right.

To impose your will on others

Is not even polite.

Peace, love and happiness –

A cliché it is true.

But one on which to base a life;

A future for the world and you.

There is no rest

Until all wrongs are right.

Until that day

All life is a fight.

Opher 13.7.2015

Rock Routes – Sixties Soul – An extract from the book.

Rock Routes – Sixties Soul – An extract from the book.

 

The US 1960s Soul Scene

Soul music, as a continuation of the US R&B tradition, really took off in 1964 and became a huge commercial success partly due to the need for good dance music in the new 1960s Discotheques.

The term Soul was attached to this musical style due more to the vocal intensity and emotional content of the music rather than any ubiquitous style. This intense vocalisation had its roots in Gospel and was first introduced in secular R&B in the work of precursors such as Ray Charles, Little Willie John, Sam Cooke, James Brown, Jackie Wilson and Clyde McPhatter. It was apparent in both uptempo numbers and soulful ballads. The centre of Soul was on the West Coast Atlantic Label with its Southern subsidiary the infamous Stax label in Memphis. From 1964 onwards the charts became full of artists producing the sound that became known as Soul. These included Otis Redding, Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Lee Dorsey, Sam & Dave, Booker T & the MGs, Percy Sledge, Carla Thomas, Joe Tex, Arthur Conley and even the Blues guitarist Albert King.

This continued into the 1970s with artists such as Brook Benton, Betty Wright, Archie Bell & the Drells and the Detroit Spinners.

Soul was a huge commercial success and gave rise to two other major genres of black R&B with Disco and Funk. In Britain it gave rise to the Northern Soul Scene with its athletic dancing and in the 1980s it underwent a renaissance with New Wave Soul.

Throughout its history Soul has produced some of the most dynamic music and performances but has also tended to suffer from commercial exploitation. The emotional rawness of this dynamic Gospel tinged music endeared it to British Mods and many US Soul artists were brought across the Atlantic to perform in British clubs where they received rapturous support. Their success also stimulated the rise of a number of British Mod Soul Bands such as the Alan Bown Set, the Action, Geno Washington and the Ram Jam Band and Jimmy James and the Vagabonds. These bands, while copying the material of the US stars produced a type of music with a different feel to it.

The huge success of soul drew many established R&B artists into adopting the style including such stars as Lee Dorsey, Little Richard and James Brown.

Without doubt the greatest Soul Artist is Otis Redding. He started out as a Little Richard impersonator before further developing the anguished emotional intensity that we associate with him on numbers such as ‘Pain in my heart’. His stage act was the epitome of high energy Soul in the manner of James Brown. He would do crazy dancing and run on the spot while tearing at his clothes in a frenzy of emotion. His amazing vocal prowess is well displayed on numbers like ‘That’s how strong my love is’, ‘Respect’, Satisfaction’, and ‘Fa fa fa fa fa fa (sad song)’. Unfortunately his career was brought to a sudden end when he was killed in an air crash in late 1967. ‘(Sitting on the) Dock of the bay’ was released following his death and became his biggest hit. This came at the time when he was not only at his peak of performance and recording but was breaking through to the counter-culture audiences who were not usually drawn to Soul being more into psychedelia and acid rock. There is no telling where this would have led.

If Otis was the King of Soul then Aretha was the Queen. Having started out as a Gospel vocalist she was encouraged to move into secular R&B by none other than Sam Cooke who had been knocked out by the power and beauty of her voice. She signed to Columbia in 1960 but it was not until she signed to Atlantic in 1966 and got the full Soul treatment that she broke through. She went on to have a series of enormous hits with numbers like ‘Respect’, Baby I love you’, ‘I never loved a man’, ‘Chain of fools’ and ‘Think’.

The Atlantic Stax label was the undisputed home of Soul. This was primarily due to the fantastic backing and writing expertise that was coming from the house band Booker T & the MGs (Memphis Group). They were heard on the recordings of most of the great Soul singers including Otis, Aretha, Sam & Dave, William Bell and Rufus Thomas as well as having a big hand in writing many of their best numbers. Booker T & the MGs went on to have a number of hits in their own right – ‘Green Onions’, ‘Chinese checkers’, ‘Hip Hug Her’, Soul limbo’ and ‘Time is tight’.

Other Atlantic stars included Solomon Burke – the King of Rock & Soul – who employed a preaching style of vocal on numbers such as ‘If you need me’; Sam & Dave, who were a dynamic vocal duo similar to Don and Dewey, they had hits with hard driving numbers – ‘You don’t know like I know’, ‘I take what I want’, ‘Hold on I’m coming’ and ‘ Soul man’ as well as softer Soul ballads – ‘When something is wrong with my baby’; Wilson Pickett, who started in the 1950s with a vocal group called the Falcons signed to Stax in 1964 and had a string of hits with high energy singles like ‘In the midnight hour’, ‘Mustang Sally’, ‘Land of a 1000 dances’, ‘Funky Broadway’, ‘6345789’ and ‘Don’t fight it’; Percy Sledge, whose powerful clear vocals secured him great success with ‘When a man loves a woman’ and ‘Warm and tender love’; King Curtis, who was a session saxophonist who had previously played on the Coasters hits ‘Yakety Yak’ and ‘Charlie Brown’, become part of the house band with both the MGs and the Markeys as well as having hits in his own right with ‘Memphis Soul Stew’ and ‘Teasin’; Eddie Floyd, who started out with Wilson Pickett in the Falcons and produced the classic ‘Knock on wood’; Arthur Conley, who gained the title of ‘Crown Prince of Soul’, for the energetic stage act he produced using a similar stage craft to Otis on uptempo numbers such as ‘Show me’ before giving up music in 1970 to become a real preacher; Patti Labelle & the Bluebelles, who started as a female Doo-Wop band in the 1950s before signing to Atlantic in 1965 and had hits with ‘All or nothing’, ‘Over the rainbow’, ‘Groovy kind of love’ and ‘take me for a little while’; the Staples Singers, who started out as a 1950s Gospel group before joining Stax in 1968 and had a number of hits with ‘Respect yourself’, ‘Be what you are’ and ‘You’ve got to earn it’.

Artists on other labels also broke into the Soul scene including Lee Dorsey, the Impressions and Gladys Knight & the Pips. Lee started out in the 1950s with R&B hits such as ‘Ya-Ya’ and ‘Do Re Mi’ before joining up with the Amy/Mala/Bell complex in the mid 1960s and having Soul hits with ‘Get out of my life’, ‘Confusion’, ‘Holy cow’, ‘Ride your pony’ and ‘Working in a coal mine’. The Impressions featured Curtis Mayfield and had a number of Soul hits in the 1960s with ‘You must believe’, ‘I’m so proud’, ‘Amen’, ‘Keep on pushing’ and ‘People get ready’. They then moved into Black Consciousness with numbers like ‘This is my country’, ‘Choice of colours’ and ‘Mighty mighty spade and whitey’. Gladys Knight & the Pips produced some Soul sounds with numbers like ‘I heard it through the grapevine’.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Opher-Goodwin/e/B00MSHUX6Y/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1436787369&sr=1-2-ent

Leonard Cohen – The Old Revolution – lyrics about the need to involve yourself. Life is a battle. We need to fight (non-violently) to make it better.

Leonard Cohen – The Old Revolution – lyrics about the need to involve yourself. Life is a battle. We need to fight (non-violently) to make it better.

This is a genius of a poem. There is so much in it.

Most people go through life without involving themselves. This is a plea to them to get involved. We have to fight and make our voices heard if we want the world to change for the better.

We have to do that despite the fact that there is no pure cause, that all our heroes are flawed, that we are sold down the river, that are goals are muddied, that our leaders are doing it for power and wealth, that we can never achieve what we would like. We still have to launch ourselves into the fray and try.

That is what life is about.

When we are young and full of idealism it seems pure and easy. Then we find we were betrayed by our heroes and used. But we still have to find a way to stay true to that idealism and carry on the struggle.

For me, no matter how perverted, there is a redolence to ISIS. All these silly young men and women fired up on religious fervour are being manipulated and used by a bunch of cynical people intent on sadism, power and sex. There’s no religious purity in it. They soldiers are indoctrinated, filled with lies and pointed at the enemy. They should wake up and use their idealism, to do something good.

While there is injustice, poaching of animals, war, torture, brutality, bigotry, fundamentalism, hatred, destruction of the environment, racism, misogyny and cruelty there is a war.

It is our duty to get involved and oppose it.

It only takes good men to remain silent for evil to exist.

“The Old Revolution”

I finally broke into the prison,
I found my place in the chain.
Even damnation is poisoned with rainbows,
all the brave young men
they’re waiting now to see a signal
which some killer will be lighting for pay.
Into this furnace I ask you now to venture,
you whom I cannot betray.I fought in the old revolution
on the side of the ghost and the King.
Of course I was very young
and I thought that we were winning;
I can’t pretend I still feel very much like singing
as they carry the bodies away.Into this furnace I ask you now to venture…

Lately you’ve started to stutter
as though you had nothing to say.
To all of my architects let me be traitor.
Now let me say I myself gave the order
to sleep and to search and to destroy.

Into this furnace I ask you now to venture…

Yes, you who are broken by power,
you who are absent all day,
you who are kings for the sake of your children’s story,
the hand of your beggar is burdened down with money,
the hand of your lover is clay.

Into this furnace I ask you now to venture…

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=leonard+cohen+old+revolution+

Elvis Presley/Joe Turner – Shake Rattle and Roll – Lyrics of a blatantly sexual theme.

Elvis Presley/Joe Turner – Shake Rattle and Roll – Lyrics of a blatantly sexual theme.

When Elvis wiggled his hips he knew exactly what he was doing.

Elvis wasn’t the polite innocent he pretended to be. His act was pure sex. He chose to cover songs like Shake Rattle and Roll with their overt sexuality knowing exactly what they were about. Elvis was sex on wheels.

It was no wonder that the repressed prudish post-war generation were so up in arms, Elvis brought in a wave of liberalism and non-conformity that swept away all the grey fifties and heralded the rebellion of the sixties.

Black musicians like Joe Turner were already singing about sex and having a wail of a time. It was the white culture that needed to catch up. But the record company was a bit slow. They insisted he clean up the lyrics a bit. They didn’t like  – Way you wear those dresses The sun comes shinin’ through  I can’t believe my eyes  All that mess belongs to you. They seemed to think there were sexual connotations.

There were.

Elvis opened the flood gate.

Shake Rattle and Roll

Get outta that bed
Wash your face and hands
Get outta that bed
Wash your face and hands
Well, you get in that kitchen
Make some noise with the pots and pans

Way you wear those dresses
The sun comes shinin’ through
Way you wear those dresses
The sun comes shinin’ through
I can’t believe my eyes
All that mess belongs to you

I believe to the soul
You’re the devil and now I know
I believe to the soul
You’re the devil and now I know
Well, the more I work
The faster my money goes

I said shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Well, you won’t do right
To save your doggone soul

Yeah, blow, Joe

I’m like a one-eyed cat
Peepin’ in a seafood store
I’m like a one-eyed cat
Peepin’ in a seafood store
Well, I can look at you
Till you ain’t no child no more

Ah, shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Well, you won’t do right
Yo save your doggone soul

I get over the hill
And way down underneath
I get over the hill
And way down underneath
You make me roll my eyes
Even make me grit my teeth

I said shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Shake, rattle and roll
Well, you won’t do nothin’
To save your doggone soul

Shake, rattle and roll