Today’s Music to keep me SssSSAaaANnnnNEEEe in Isolation – Ian Dury – Do It Yourself

I love these guys who work with words!! Ian’s one of them!

(4) Ian Dury And The Blockheads – Do It Yourself (1979) Full Album – YouTube

Today’s Music to keep me SsSAAAanNNnEee in Isolation – Ian Dury

Ian is a very clever wordsmith who cheers me up no end. Lovely to see live!!

I miss him.

Sweet Gene Vincent – YouTube

Ian Dury – Wake up and make love with me – YouTube

Ian Dury – clevor trevor – YouTube

Ian Dury & The Blockheads Billericay Dickie 1977 – YouTube

Ian Dury & The Blockheads – What a Waste 1978 – YouTube

Ian Dury And The Blockheads – Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll (TOPPOP) (1977) (HD) – YouTube

Ian Dury and The Blockheads – Reasons To Be Cheerful, Pt. 3 (Official HD Video) – YouTube

Ian Dury – You’ll See Glimpses – wonderful idealistic lyrics.

Ian Dury – You’ll See Glimpses – wonderful idealistic lyrics.

Ian Dury is wonderful. He was a genius. I loved his poetry and philosophy even though he was meant to have been a cantankerous bastard.
I think this song really captures the dreams of an idealist. They all think I’m mad too. There’s almost a defeatist, listen to the band on the Titanic – it’s going to go down anyway. There’s nothing you can do. Might as well just have a good time and forget that the tycoons are strip-mining the wildernesses and chopping down the jungles, and slaughtering the animals, while the religious fanatics think that god will save the day or it doesn’t matter we’re all going to paradise.
I don’t believe that rubbish.
I’m looking out from the bows and pointing at the ice-berg. We can steer round it! It doesn’t have to end in disaster!
The answers to the world’s problems are all simple. There is nothing hard about it. We elect the psychopaths. We support the business men and bankers (and they are nearly all men) on their mad journey to increase their own pots of gold. We follow the religious nutters on their crusades, inquisitions and caliphates. We are always surprised when the inevitable happens.
Instead of growth lets think sustainable. Instead of nations lets think globally. Instead of worn out diatribes from long deceased superstitions let’s think United Nations charter of Rights. Instead of tribes and patriotism lets think brother and sisterhood. Instead of war, aggression and violence lets think peace, love and fraternity. Instead of homogeneity lets value the difference. Instead of hatred lets work on trust. Instead of destroying – let’s build.
It’s all about a positive Zeitgeist. You’re all welcome.
People tell me it’s human nature; we can’t fight it.
I say bollocks. We’ve come a long way. We don’t burn people, use cat-o-nines, whip, torture, castrate and murder anymore – at least not in this country. We need a global mandate to prevent the pockets of uncivilised behaviour, like ISIS, from having too great an effect.
We don’t go bear-baiting, cock-fighting, dog-fighting or hang people from gibbets.
Human beings can progress and become civilised. We’ve come a long way.
I agree with Ian. I like his dream better than ISIS’s nightmare!
It’s a dream. I get glimpses of it. It could be real!
You’ll See Glimpses
(All spoken)
You’ll see.
They think I’m off my crust as I creep about the caff.
But I’m really getting ready to surprise them all,
Because I’m busy sorting out the problems of the world.
And when I reveal all I may get a crinkly mouth.
I’ve given my all to the task at hand unstintingly.
When it’s all over I’ll rest on my laurels.
Here for a moment is a glimpse of my plan:
All the kids will be happy learning things.
The wind will smell of wild flowers.
Nobody will whack each other about with nasty things.
All the room in the world.
They take me for a mug because I smile.
They think I’m too out of tune to mind being patronised.
All in all, it’s been another phase in my chosen career,
And when my secrets are out they’ll bite their silly tongues.
All I want for my birthday is another birthday.
When skies are blue we all feel the benefit.
Glimpse Number 2 for the listener.
Everyone will feel useful in lovely ways.
Trees will be firmly rooted in town and country.
Illness and despair will be dispensed with.
All the room in the world.
They ask me if I’ve had the voices yet.
They don’t think I know any true answers.
It’s true that I haven’t quite finished yet.
When it all comes out in the wash they’ll eat their words.
I’ve got all their names and addresses.
Later on I’ll write them each a thank-you letter.
Before I stop, here’s a last glimpse into the general future.
Home rule will exist in each home, forever.
Every living thing will be another friend.
This wonderful state of affairs will last for always.
This has been got out by a friend.

 

The Blues Muse – West London – If it ain’t Stiff

In the wake of Punk the Independent labels flourished. This was a break from corporate control. It was as if the music was unleashed. There was a flurry of creativity and energy. The Stiff Label led the way.

West London

When Jake Riviera told me that he was setting up business with Dave Robinson and did I want to come in on it I was interested. I knew Dave Robinson had previously worked with Jimmy Hendrix. In my book anybody who worked with Jimi had to be OK. Not only that but Jake had been manager of Dr Feelgood and instrumental in the whole of that seventies Pub Rock scene and Wilko Johnson was one of my favourite characters. He was an original. I’d seen Chuck Berry do his machine gun stance but Wilco had taken that a stage further and his robotic, head jerking, staccato movements, complete with bulging eyes and open mouth belied an amazing guitar ability.

I soon found out I’d be working with Nick Lowe as a producer. Things just got better and better.

I asked Jake just what he was intending to do. He told me that he was the garbage collector. They were looking to get all the rejects that nobody else wanted and give them the production they required and turn them into stars. They were going to call the label STIFF because they were dealing with the dead, they were the undertakers to the business.

On the face of it this did not appear to be much of a business plan. Most of the rejects were that way because they had no commercial potential or expertise. But then I had faith in Jake. If anyone could pick out talent it was him. Besides the rules had changed. This was a different ballgame. Punk had blown the old game out of the water and whenever there’s a sea-change the big corporations were slow to adapt. I had a feeling that this was Decca letting the Beatles slip through their fingers all over again.

Perhaps Stiff was just the place to be. I was in.

That is how I got to meet Ian Dury, Elvis Costello, Wreckless Eric and a host of others.

I connived to go out on the Live Stiffs tour with Ian, Elvis and Wreckless. It was a package tour in the nature of the old Rock ‘n’ Roll packages. It might have lost money, I don’t know, but the publicity and mayhem more than made up for that. When you’ve got a busload of characters you’re going to get a riot. Every night they rotated the headlining act but all came together for a finale of Ian’s Sex and Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll. That about summed it up.

I’d stand at the side and watch the mixture of genius, hilarity and pandemonium take shape. It made me feel proud to be associated with an independent label. If the corporations had got their mits on Elvis and Ian they would have sanitised them into oblivion. Fortunately they’d kicked them out. Talent like that deserved the best and they got it. I’ve always rated those guys as among the greatest. The music they unleashed had all the power and fury of Punk coupled with intelligence and originality – just how music should be.

Working for Stiff was always different. They did things that no big label ever would like the release of the 12” entitled ‘The Wit and Wisdom of Ronald Reagan’ which was blank on both sides.

I’ve still got my ‘If it ain’t Stiff it ain’t worth a Fuck’ badge.

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If you would like to purchase The Blues Muse, or any of my other books please follow the links:

In the UK:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Opher-Goodwin/e/B00MSHUX6Y/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1479943367&sr=1-2-ent

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blues-Muse-Opher-Goodwin/dp/1518621147/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1479943367&sr=1-1&keywords=opher+goodwin

In the US:

https://www.amazon.com/Opher-Goodwin/e/B00MSHUX6Y/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1479943510&sr=1-2-ent

https://www.amazon.com/Blues-Muse-Opher-Goodwin-ebook/dp/B01HDQEMQ6/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1479943567&sr=1-1&keywords=opher+goodwin+blues+muse

https://www.amazon.com/Blues-Muse-Opher-Goodwin/dp/1518621147/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1479943578&sr=1-2&keywords=opher+goodwin+blues+muse

For all other countries please check out your local Amazon outlet.

Tribute to Rock Genius – Ian Dury

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Ian Dury

Ian was a wordsmith. He started as an artist splashing colour but he ended up painting pictures with words. He loved playing with them. He was an outspoken, controversial and cantankerous person.

His childhood was blighted with polio, which left him permanently crippled, and what sounds like a horrendous experience in a home for disabled children. It left a lasting impression on his personality.

Emerging from Art School to take on the Pub Rock scene with Kilburn and the Highroads Ian began honing his writing skills. They really came to the fore with the production of his first solo album with the Blockheads. Not only was it musically more developed with a crisp production but the Stiff label release of this, along with the single ‘Sex and Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll’, set the tone for controversial lyrics and put Ian and the Blockheads at the forefront of the British New Wave/Punk explosion.

Nobody sounded like Ian. His voice wasn’t exactly operatic with its exaggerated Essex twang and the expletives certainly gave it an edge but his use of words was unique. It must have been interesting to see the rivalry between Ian and Elvis on the first Stiff tour. They were both masters at word play.

The music from the Blockheads was very tight and Ian formed a tight assemblage with the likes of Chas Jankel, Mick Gallagher, Charlie Charles and Norman Watt-Roy. They produced a rocky funky feel for Ian to string his words over like a manic Ray Winston.

Ian’s live act was extraordinary and totally different and bizarre. It was like a vaudeville clown on acid. He come on in various colourful and striped attire like a psychedelic tramp; divest himself of hats, ju-jus, bells, scarves, jackets, shirts, T-shirts, canes and various props, stuff things in his mouth, toot on horns, blow on whistles and yell out ‘OI OI!!’. It was the most visual and interesting spectacle I’ve ever witnessed. The wonder of it simply does not come across in film.

The songs were immensely varied with deployment of humour and extremely clever lyrics and topics as diverse as geniuses, reasons to be cheerful, his (also crippled) Rock idol Gene Vincent, employment choices, sex, his father, interesting Essex characters, and a recipe for utopia. His song ‘Spasticus Autisicus’ was a howl of angst aimed at what Ian viewed as a condescending attitude towards the disabled in the International Year of the Disabled Persons for which he had been asked to contribute. It got him banned by the BBC which I bet really pleased him.

Ian was entirely original, had a great vision and complex character. He never shied from causing offence or tackling subject matter that might cause upset. His death from cancer robbed us of a master song-writer and idiosyncratic performer who conformed to nothing.

Fortunately the Blockheads are still going strong storming out Ian’s songs so his spirit lives!

Ian Dury – You’ll See Glimpses – wonderful idealistic lyrics.

Ian Dury is wonderful. He was a genius. I loved his poetry and philosophy even though he was meant to have been a cantankerous bastard.

I think this song really captures the dreams of an idealist. They all think I’m mad too. There’s almost a defeatist, listen to the band on the Titanic – it’s going to go down anyway. There’s nothing you can do. Might as well just have a good time and forget that the tycoons are strip-mining the wildernesses and chopping down the jungles, and slaughtering the animals, while the religious fanatics think that god will save the day or it doesn’t matter we’re all going to paradise.

I don’t believe that rubbish.

I’m looking out from the bows and pointing at the ice-berg. We can steer round it! It doesn’t have to end in disaster!

The answers to the world’s problems are all simple. There is nothing hard about it. We elect the psychopaths. We support the business men and bankers (and they are nearly all men) on their mad journey to increase their own pots of gold. We follow the religious nutters on their crusades, inquisitions and caliphates. We are always surprised when the inevitable happens.

Instead of growth lets think sustainable. Instead of nations lets think globally. Instead of worn out diatribes from long deceased superstitions let’s think United Nations charter of Rights. Instead of tribes and patriotism lets think brother and sisterhood. Instead of war, aggression and violence lets think peace, love and fraternity. Instead of homogeneity lets value the difference. Instead of hatred lets work on trust. Instead of destroying – let’s build.

It’s all about a positive Zeitgeist. You’re all welcome.

People tell me it’s human nature; we can’t fight it.

I say bollocks. We’ve come a long way. We don’t burn people, use cat-o-nines, whip, torture, castrate and murder anymore – at least not in this country. We need a global mandate to prevent the pockets of uncivilised behaviour, like ISIS, from having too great an effect.

We don’t go bear-baiting, cock-fighting, dog-fighting or hang people from gibbets.

Human beings can progress and become civilised. We’ve come a long way.

I agree with Ian. I like his dream better than ISIS’s nightmare!

It’s a dream. I get glimpses of it. It could be real!

You’ll See Glimpses

(All spoken)

You’ll see.

They think I’m off my crust as I creep about the caff.
But I’m really getting ready to surprise them all,
Because I’m busy sorting out the problems of the world.
And when I reveal all I may get a crinkly mouth.
I’ve given my all to the task at hand unstintingly.
When it’s all over I’ll rest on my laurels.

Here for a moment is a glimpse of my plan:
All the kids will be happy learning things.
The wind will smell of wild flowers.
Nobody will whack each other about with nasty things.
All the room in the world.

They take me for a mug because I smile.
They think I’m too out of tune to mind being patronised.
All in all, it’s been another phase in my chosen career,
And when my secrets are out they’ll bite their silly tongues.
All I want for my birthday is another birthday.
When skies are blue we all feel the benefit.

Glimpse Number 2 for the listener.
Everyone will feel useful in lovely ways.
Trees will be firmly rooted in town and country.
Illness and despair will be dispensed with.
All the room in the world.

They ask me if I’ve had the voices yet.
They don’t think I know any true answers.
It’s true that I haven’t quite finished yet.
When it all comes out in the wash they’ll eat their words.
I’ve got all their names and addresses.
Later on I’ll write them each a thank-you letter.

Before I stop, here’s a last glimpse into the general future.
Home rule will exist in each home, forever.
Every living thing will be another friend.
This wonderful state of affairs will last for always.

This has been got out by a friend.

Read more: Ian Dury & The Blockheads – You’ll See Glimpses Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Ian Dury – You’ll See Glimpses – Ian’s vision of utopia. Let’s hope we can make it come true.

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Poetic genius with complete disregard for decorum or audience. Ian wrote what he wanted and created the most outrageous, delightful and extreme lyrics.

He couldn’t really sing but was perfect to front the blockheads. He was colourful, extraordinary and an individual. Combining vaudeville clowning and zany props he created a live act that was unique. Nobody else pulled scarves out of their mouth, blew whistles and devested themselves of articles of clothing quite like Ian. He was a one off.

This song is a vision of utopia. It’s a bit tongue in cheek but none the less conveys a great deal of truth and beauty. I’d like to live in that world. It’s a million miles from Punk and yet, somehow, has all that Punk attitude. It’s delivered in a way that only Ian could pull off. A gem.

He took the energy of Punk, sensitivity and taste of an artist, playfulness of a poet and created something completely different. We miss you Ian!

You’ll See Glimpses – Ian Dury

You’ll see.

They think I’m off my crust as I creep about the caff.
But I’m really getting ready to surprise them all,
Because I’m busy sorting out the problems of the world.
And when I reveal all I may get a crinkly mouth.
I’ve given my all to the task at hand unstintingly.
When it’s all over I’ll rest on my laurels.

Here for a moment is a glimpse of my plan:
All the kids will be happy learning things.
The wind will smell of wild flowers.
Nobody will whack each other about with nasty things.
All the room in the world.

They take me for a mug because I smile.
They think I’m too out of tune to mind being patronised.
All in all, it’s been another phase in my chosen career,
And when my secrets are out they’ll bite their silly tongues.
All I want for my birthday is another birthday.
When skies are blue we all feel the benefit.

Glimpse Number 2 for the listener.
Everyone will feel useful in lovely ways.
Trees will be firmly rooted in town and country.
Illness and despair will be dispensed with.
All the room in the world.

They ask me if I’ve had the voices yet.
They don’t think I know any true answers.
It’s true that I haven’t quite finished yet.
When it all comes out in the wash they’ll eat their words.
I’ve got all their names and addresses.
Later on I’ll write them each a thank-you letter.

Before I stop, here’s a last glimpse into the general future.
Home rule will exist in each home, forever.
Every living thing will be another friend.
This wonderful state of affairs will last for always.

This has been got out by a friend.

Read more: Ian Dury & The Blockheads – You’ll See Glimpses Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Ian Dury and the Blockheads – Opher’s World pays tribute to genius.

 ian dury

Ian was a wordsmith. He started as an artist splashing colour but he ended up painting pictures with words. He loved playing with them. He was an outspoken, controversial and cantankerous person.

His childhood was blighted with polio, which left him permanently crippled, and what sounds like a horrendous experience in a home for disabled children. It left a lasting impression on his personality.

Emerging from Art School to take on the Pub Rock scene with Kilburn and the Highroads Ian began honing his writing skills. They really came to the fore with the production of his first solo album with the Blockheads. Not only was it musically more developed with a crisp production but the Stiff label release of this, along with the single ‘Sex and Drugs and Rock ‘n’ Roll’, set the tone for controversial lyrics and put Ian and the Blockheads at the forefront of the British New Wave/Punk explosion.

Nobody sounded like Ian. His voice wasn’t exactly operatic with its exaggerated Essex twang and the expletives certainly gave it an edge but his use of words was unique. It must have been interesting to see the rivalry between Ian and Elvis on the first Stiff tour. They were both masters at word play.

The music from the Blockheads was very tight and Ian formed a tight assemblage with the likes of Chas Jankel, Mick Gallagher, Charlie Charles and Norman Watt-Roy. They produced a rocky funky feel for Ian to string his words over like a manic Ray Winston.

Ian’s live act was extraordinary and totally different and bizarre. It was like a vaudeville clown on acid. He come on in various colourful and striped attire like a psychedelic tramp; divest himself of hats, ju-jus, bells, scarves, jackets, shirts, T-shirts, canes and various props, stuff things in his mouth, toot on horns, blow on whistles and yell out ‘OI OI!!’. It was the most visual and interesting spectacle I’ve ever witnessed. The wonder of it simply does not come across in film.

The songs were immensely varied with deployment of humour and extremely clever lyrics and topics as diverse as geniuses, reasons to be cheerful, his (also crippled) Rock idol Gene Vincent, employment choices, sex, his father, interesting Essex characters, and a recipe for utopia. His song Spasticus Autisicus was a howl of angst aimed at what Ian viewed as a condescending attitude towards the disabled in the International Year of the Disabled Persons for which he had been asked to contribute. It got him banned by the BBC which I bet really pleased him.

Ian was entirely original, had a great vision and complex character. He never shied from causing offence or tackling subject matter that might cause upset. His death from cancer robbed us of a master song-writer and idiosyncratic performer who conformed to nothing.

Fortunately the Blockheads are still going strong storming out Ian’s songs. His spirit lives!